Hyacinths - Fragrant & Fabulous
Posted by Ben Rotteveel on

Hyacinth - Fragrant & Fabulous

Tulips, narcissi, hyacinths, snowdrops…. there are so many beautiful flower bulbs, and they all have their own charm and characteristics. In this blog series we would like to introduce you to a variety of them, helping you to make the best choices for your garden and grow the spring display of your dreams!

 

Sweet-smelling spring.

Native to the eastern Mediterranean, this distant cousin of the Asparagus is hardy in USDA zones 4-8. It sports broad single or double flower spikes, with sweet smelling florets and long pointy leaves that are folded lengthwise. Hyacinths have been around for a long time and are associated with spring, renewal and rebirth in many cultures around the globe.

 Hyacinth Blue and White

Plant Passport

  • Height

Hyacinths grow up to be 5 inches tall.

  • Fragrance

Hyacinths might very well be the most fragrant of all the flower bulbs. Their sweet, floral smell enchants humans and bees alike, creating a happy and healthy environment for all of nature’s creatures.

  • Color

White, deep blue and pink/purple are the classic Hyacinth colors, and here at DutchGrown we sell many varieties in these colors. However, we also have a few more unusual and exciting hues in our Hyacinth range, like the salmon orange Gipsy Queen, the buttery yellow Yellow Queen and the very exclusive almost-black Dark Dimension.

  • Bloom time

Hyacinths bloom in early to mid spring, together with daffodils and early tulips.

  • Longevity

Once planted, Hyacinth flower bulbs will bloom every year, making them perennial plants. Hyacinths do not naturalize.

  • Different types

Hyacinths can be categorized into flowers with single florets, or ‘standard’ Hyacinths, like the deep blue Blue Jacket, and those with double florets, such as the cerise pink Hollyhock.

  • Planting

To plant Hyacinths in your garden, select a place that gets full sun or partial shade, where the soil is well draining. When fall comes around, plant the bulbs 5 inches deep at a minimum of 3 inches apart, with the pointy ends upwards. Water well after planting, and come April you’ll have a garden full of delicious-smelling flowers. A small word of warning: Hyacinth bulbs contain oxalic acid, which might irritate your skin. Be sure to use gloves when handling them for extended periods.

  • Forcing

Hyacinths are sometimes jokingly called ‘the Christmas trees of flower bulbs’, because forcing them for the festive season has become somewhat of a tradition in many households. The container you force the Hyacinths in doesn’t need drainage holes. About twelve weeks before the Holidays, you start by placing a layer of damp compost at the bottom. On top of that you place the bulbs with their points upwards, close but not touching. Fill the space around the bulbs with more compost until the tips are just poking through. Cover the container with a black garbage bag and place them in a cold and dark place like a basement, shed or garage where they can be kept at a temperature of around 50F for 10 weeks. Do check them every now and again for dryness, and water accordingly. When shoots are peeking through the compost, it’s time to bring the containers indoors, to a bright but cool place. After a week there you can place them directly on a windowsill or table, where after about two weeks they will start flowering.

  • Container Planting

A bunch of Hyacinths growing together in a terracotta pot or large planter looks wonderful. Make sure the container you select is quite high and has drainage holes, and fill it with potting soil. Treat the container like a mini-garden: plant the bulbs about 4 inches deep into the pot, but a bit closer together than you would in a flowerbed. Water well and put the containers in a place where you can be sure the temperature won’t go above 40F in winter.

  • Pricing

If you like the look of a new variety for your garden, such as the lightest blue of Blue Eyes, you can try out 5 bulbs for $1.45 / bulb, but discounts can go up to more than 50% off when you buy a thousand bulbs for $0.68 / bulb. DutchGrown is also very excited to offer you the very rare purple-black Dark Dimension, which starts at $5.90 / bulb for just one bulb, but goes down to $3.95 / bulb for a hundred bulbs.

  • Combinations

Hyacinths grow at the same time as daffodils and early tulips, and will go wonderfully with very red tulips like Parade and charming yellow daffodils like mini daffodil Jetfire.

Favorites and variety

Want to experience the lovely fragrance and jolly look of Hyacinths for yourself? Our intuitive website will help you pick the perfect varieties for you. Can’t choose? Order our Empire State Mix and we’ll send you six different colors of Hyacinths, making sure they arrive when planting conditions are at their peak.

About Us

Meet Ben, our Flower Bulb Specialist

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